Tuesday, October 30, 2007

It takes a village

Several times over the past week, I've heard the comment "It takes a village to raise a child." This comment is often followed by the phrase, "And it takes a village to bury one." In this case, we buried two.

Tragedies come in all shapes and sizes. Some affect only a few people, others concern millions. This week as the news has been all about the wildfires in Southern California, a family in my community experienced a tragedy of unimaginable proportions. Two young children, twin boys, drowned in a bathtub. What comes to mind first when reading this? Where were the parents? Who would leave young children unattended in the bath? These common questions led to a number of negative blogs and reports, harsh comments that could only add to the unbearable agony of the parents and family members of these young boys.

I heard of the accident shortly after it happened. The news literally took my breath away. This couldn't be true. These precious little boys couldn't be gone. I couldn't fathom how the accident had occurred, but I did know that I didn't have the whole story. Knowing the parents, I couldn't imagine the boys being left unattended, especially in the bath. Perhaps the reason I couldn't imagine it was because the reality was so completely different from what the news had led people to believe.

The twins hadn't been left in the tub. They had gotten there all by themselves. How they bypassed several safety measures, we aren't sure. What I do know is that the outpouring of love this family has received has been simply overwhelming.

Their hearts are still broken. This new reality is one they don't want to live in, yet they have experienced so much love and kindness and their home is constantly filled to overflowing with people wanting to help. The parents want to celebrate the lives of their children who were taken so early from this life and so many people want to help them remember the good times.

Friends and family have traveled from all over the world. Neighbors and acquaintances have bonded together, each offering their unique talents to give the family as much support as possible. No one can bring their beloved twins back, but perhaps together family, friends, neighbors, and yes even our little village, can lift them up as they mourn their loss and learn to heal and hope again.

8 comments:

so grateful to be Mormon! said...

oh traci, so sorry to hear of this. i don't know what to say. i can not imagine what this is like for the loved ones left behind. beautiful that you were able to offer some comfort and care in performance of your busy service project. you have a kind soul traci. i am sure you helped ease their pain some. blessings to all affected, kathleen

Dapoppins said...

too painful for words....

Chuck said...

I came here for the first time via cre8Buzz and my heart just broke in two. My thoughts are with this family.

Meisha said...

That is terrible. My condolences go to the family.
I absolutely can't stand it when I read or hear snide comments by people criticizing someone who was affected by a tragedy like that. So completely judgmental and insensitive.
Also, it's events like that, that make me so grateful I'm LDS. While a tragedy like that would still be nearly unbearable, there is still an underlying hope, knowing where the loved ones have gone.

Summer said...

How heart wrenching.

Josi said...

I think we all look for someone to 'blame' because it helps us believe it would never happen to us, that there was a specific 'wrong' that allowed something like this to happen. but there is still truth, regardless of what people look for to give them a sense of security. I'm so sorry for all of you, I can not even fathom what it's been like. What a horrible ordeal.

suchsimplepleasures said...

oh my! that is the most tragic thing! i am so incredibly sorry for the family. it is, most definitely, a parents nightmare.
my thoughts are with the family and the everyone affected by this awful tragedy.

childlife said...

Oh, heartbreaking! I wish people would just realize up front that they DON'T have all the information and that assumptions just aren't fair and are often cruel.

I've dealt with this subject often... My daughter was born with a rare birth defect. She has since had surgery that has corrected it, but people used to come to, and voice the most horrific conclusions. My thoughts and prayers go out to these parents.